Tewkesbury Museum, Gloucestershire

£10.00£30.00

This charming market town Museum is situated in the centre of Tewkesbury, the site of the famous battle of Tewkesbury in 1471.
Seemingly quaint by day, Tewkesbury museum takes on a whole different feeling once dusk sets.
And did we mention there have also been claims of poltergeist activity?
Leave fear at home as you delve into the secrets that this impressive 17th century building has to offer.

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Description

Tewkesbury Museum,Gloucestershire

Date: Friday 26th February 2021
Time: 9pm-2am

This charming market town Museum is situated in the centre of Tewkesbury, the site of the famous battle of Tewkesbury in 1471.
Seemingly quaint by day, Tewkesbury museum takes on a whole different feeling once dusk sets.
And did we mention there have also been claims of poltergeist activity?
Leave fear at home as you delve into the secrets that this impressive 17th century building has to offer.

Location History:

The present building, like many in Tewkesbury, dates from about 1650, the period following the Civil War. It was built as a single dwelling for a well to do family. Probably a merchant’s house as many street houses would have been.

The likelihood is that the original building was just a room deep on Barton Street, with a courtyard behind and outbuildings. It has been extended and changed over the centuries. The wide north-facing front windows on all the floors are typical of cloth-working; weaving or knitting, so these front rooms may have been used as work rooms.

The earliest plans we have are from a post-war survey. They show rooms behind the present building which were demolished in 1958 in order to provide space to extend the George Watson Memorial Hall. The demolished areas were derelict, but comprised the kitchen, wash-house and toilets, as well as a first floor bedroom. The plan also shows a curved boundary abutting the west of the building, where land had previously been taken and added to the Watson Hall site.

Unlike similar buildings in the town (the Hat Shop and Warwick  House in Church Street; the Wheatsheaf in High Street, for instance) where the passage door is set to the side of the building, allowing access to workshops and dwellings at the rear, this building has a central passage doorway. Maybe this is because there was no significant space for rear development, with much of the old plot already lost to Saffron Road at the rear.

The first real reference to the building, other than census records, comes because it, and property to the west, was sold to the Society of Friends (the Quakers) to build a new meeting house. The Friends had outgrown their premises in St Mary’s Lane. In 1805 they bought 64 Barton Street from Thomas and Ann Andrews, linen drapers, for £200.

The 1841 census shows Rev. Henry (an Independent Minister) and Susan Welford in occupation, with five daughters, two sons and a servant. There was a second household in the property; Harriet Fannoms, though she had disappeared by the next census, when the Welfords were the only occupants.

In 1862, the ‘front dwelling house’ was let separately, and from then until the turn of the century it was always shown as two dwellings. In 1957, the plans show the west part of the building with a separate entrance off the street, to a two bedroom house. A sketch of the building from the middle of the nineteenth century by George Rowe (in the Museum) shows this entrance, but with a much more imposing window than the current one.

In 1900, a Mrs M.A. Jones owned the property, which she did until she sold it to the Borough Council in 1957. During the war it was used to house 13 child evacuees. After the war the housing crisis led to it becoming heavily overcrowded, though officially divided into three flats. Each room seemed to contain a family!

In 1957 the building was purchased by the ‘old’ Borough Council as part of a plan to extend the Watson Hall, which they had recently taken responsibility for. The purchase was funded by Mr Martin Cadbury, on the condition that it be used to create a Museum.

It was five years before the people living there could be re-housed and the necessary alterations made. The rear range was demolished to make way for the Watson Hall’s coffee area, toilets and the Tudor Bar. The remaining building was altered to provide a caretaker’s flat and a Museum.

Reported Paranormal Activity:

Shadowy figures have been witnessed roaming Tewkesbury museum, along with the sound of ghostly footsteps walking around the exhibitions.
A most recent account of activity tells of a lady, who during an investigation, had two coins thrown at her which hit her head.
But these reports do not just come from those who have attended paranormal investigations; Unsuspecting visitors during the day have also claimed to have experienced the museums plethora of spooks. People have reported the feeling of being watched when no one else has been around  and also being touched by unseen hands.

Covid-19

Inevitably, given the current Covid-19 pandemic, we have had to structure our events a little differently to ensure the safety of both our guests and the team.  

Please ensure that you read about the changes to our events, by visiting the Covid-19 information page BEFORE you book. 

To read the Government guidelines on Covid-19 please click here 

Important factors to consider before booking:

This event may be unsuitable for people with mobility impairments due to the nature of the property being visited. Please call to check anything you might be unsure about before booking your tickets.

All remaining balances for this event at Tewkesbury Museum will be due by Friday 26th February 2021.

 

 

 

 

Additional information

Payment Options

Full Payment £30.00, Deposit Payment £10.00, Remaining Balance £20.00

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